Friday, September 15, 2017 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

COMPENSATORY EFFORT ALLOCATION MODEL OF SOCIAL FACILITATION – CEAMS

  • Abstract: Social facilitation is a widely studied phenomenon where performance on a simple, or well-known, task is improved by the presence of another person, but performance on a complex, or novel, task is hindered by said social presence. Previous research has determined that the use of social presence may improve performance on cognitive organizational tasks such as vigilance. Social facilitation has been implemented in a variety of ways (i.e., mere presence; evaluative presence), each to different degrees of success. However, to date, there has not been any sort of consolidation regarding the different implementations of social facilitation. The present discussion provide a series of experiments that highlight some of the underrepresented forms of presence (i.e., co-acting, electronic presence) and how observer status may actually influence performance more so than the form of presence. Theoretical implications are discussed, as a new theoretical framework (Compensatory Effort Allocation Model of Social Facilitation – CEAMS) is presented.
  • Biography: Victoria is a doctoral student in the Human Factors and Cognitive Psychology program at the University of Central Florida. She received a BS in psychology from the University of Florida in 2013 and a MS in Modeling and Simulation from UCF in 2015. Her research interests include the study of human motivation in vigilance, as well as, how the social presence of others can mitigate the vigilance decrement.

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PSY 105 *

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Psychology Department Calendar

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