Thursday, April 18, 2019 noon to 1 p.m.

Andreas E. Vasdekis

Department of Physics,

University of Idaho

www.aevlab.org

Abstract:

No two individual cells ever “look” the same, even if they share the same genes and grow under identical conditions. This unexpected phenomenon, generally termed cellular noise, inevitably emerges due to the stochastic nature of molecular-level interactions during protein production. In this talk I will first introduce this phenomenon and its origins. I will then present the bioimaging and microfluidic methods we employ to investigate cellular noise, as well as our recent findings that focus primarily on cellular growth, lipid production, and trade-offs between them.

Biography:

Dr. Andreas Vasdekis received his MSc and PhD in soft condensed matter and photonics at the University of St. Andrews (UK). He then spent four years as a postdoctoral scholar at Caltech (USA) and the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland). Prior to joining the University of Idaho, he was at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (USA) for two years. Presently, his research focuses on single-cell biophysics and the development of enabling optical and microsystem instrumentation.

Location:

CREOL : 103

Contact:

Demetrios Christodoulides demetri@creol.ucf.edu

Calendar:

CREOL Calendar

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Speaker/Lecture/Seminar

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